Newsletters:

IT Workers Generally Satisfied

Jun 13, 2006
By

CIO Update Staff






Nearly four out of five (78%) of IT workers are very or somewhat satisfied with their cash and benefits, compared to 72% of all workers. These findings come from Hudson’s Transforming Pay Plans: 2006 Compensation and Benefits Report , which surveyed 10,000 workers across all sectors of the economy, examining employee attitudes about traditional and non-traditional pay and benefit programs.

Raises & Bonuses

IT professionals also anticipate making more money in 2006 than in 2005—57% indicate they will earn more. Only 41% of the overall work force believes this to be the case. Also, almost half (46%) of the IT work force received a raise within the last six months, compared to 33% of all respondents.


When it comes to raises, 47% of IT workers’ raises are based on their performance, while that is the case for only 35% of all workers.

Benefits

Tech workers were more likely to participate in their organization’s benefit programs than the overall work force. Specifically, 84% of IT employees participate in their employer’s health plan, compared to only 62% of all workers.

Additionally, this group of workers are also more likely to participate in a health savings account if it is offered by the company. At the same time, 71% of the IT work force has an employer-sponsored retirement plan, compared to less than half (47%) of the entire work force.

When asked about non-traditional benefits, IT workers were more interested in job-related training (20%) than the general work force (13%). However, their first choice is a more flexible work schedule, a sentiment shared by the population at large.

Methodology

The survey is based on a national phone poll of 10,000 U.S. workers conducted March 20-26, 2006 and was compiled by Rasmussen Reports, an independent research firm.


 

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